Poems from Llyfr Aneirin,

(The Book of Aneirin).

 

Photograph: Ben Stammers and Sarah Roberts

 

Copy of a 6th century lyre with an amber bridge

made by Guy Flockhart (detail).

 

'Peis Dinogat' (mp4)

Bragod performing 'Peis Dinogat' (extract).

This is a track from their album, 'Kaingk'.

 

'Peis Dinogat' - Download - zip

About 1.3 MB

 

Peis Dinogat

Dinogat's Smock

 

In setting both Peis Dinogat and Awdl LI. from The Book of Aneirin,the duo has drawn on principles set forth by Boethius in his De institutione musica (probably written before 510 A.D.), a compendium and discussion of ancient Greek musical theory written in Latin and presented in the light of Christian thought. Bragod has created a strong musical contrast between the poems ('Kaingk', Tracks 12 and 13 ). Welsh poetry of this period has no stress save a light, upward, melodic stress at the ends of phrases and this feature is reflected in the contour of the melody. The lines may be a simple unit, divide into two or into three phrases (see Dr. Isaac's indications in the poem below). Dr. Isaac divides the poem into four parts and Bragod assigns each of the first three parts a different tetrachord taken from the hexachord - CDEFGA: 1. DEFG, 2. EFGA, 3. CDEF. The fourth part uses all the tetrachords together, 4. CDEFGA. In the 6th, 7th and 8th centuries the poet, lyre-player and singer would probably have been the same person. This poem is not part of 'The Gododdin' and possibly of later date but one of the scribes of The Book of Aneirin wrote it in a blank space. It is a poem commemorating a fallen hero, written by a professional poet, possibly in the voice of Dinogat's mother.

 

 

Welsh edition from G. R. Isaac, 'Mydr a Pherfformiad yr Hengerdd ', Dwned 7, (2001).

English translation by Dr. Isaac.

 

 

Peis Dinogat
 
Peis Dinogat, e vreith, vreith,
o grwyn | balaot ban | wreith.
Chwit, chwit, chwidogeith,
gochanwn | gochenyn | wythgeith.

Dinogat's Smock

Dinogad's smock, speckled, speckled,
I made from the skins of martens.
Whistle, whistle, whistly
we sing, the eight slaves sing.
Pan elei | dy dad ty | e helya,
llath ar y ysgwyd, | llory en y law
 
ef gelwi gwn gogyhwc,
'Giff, Gaff, dhaly, dhaly, dhwc, dhwc!',
ef lledi bysg yng corwg,
mal ban llad llew llywywc.
When your father used to go to hunt,
with his shaft on his shoulder and his club
...................... in his hand,
he would call his speedy dogs,
'Giff, Gaff, catch, catch, fetch, fetch!',
he would kill a fish in a coracle,
as a lion kills an animal.
Pan elei | dy dat ty | e vynyd,
dydygei ef penn ywrch, | penn gwythwch, penn hydd,
penn grugyar vreith o venyd,
penn pysc | o rayadyr | Derwennyd
When your father used to go to the mountain,
he would bring back a roebuck, a wild pig, a stag,
a speckled grouse from the mountain,
a fish from the waterfall of Derwennyd
Or sawl yt gyrhaedei | dy dat ty ae gicwein,
o wythwch | a llewyn | a llwy[n]ein,
nyt anghei | oll ny vei | oradein.
Whatever your father would hit with his spit,
whether wild pig or lynx or fox,
nothing that was without wings would escape.

 

  

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